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ESG Data Center

In January 2020, a novel strain of coronavirus (COVID-19) was declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern and was subsequently declared a global pandemic in March 2020. COVID-19 began to impact our business in March 2020, affecting most geographies and across a variety of our customer types throughout the rest of the year. The results of these impacts may be reflected in the 2020 data below. Further details on year-over-year changes may be found in the applicable sections of WM's ESG Resource Hub.

On October 30, 2020, we completed our acquisition of Advanced Disposal Services (ADS), which impacted our number of employees, facilities and assets. Results of these impacts may be reflected in the 2020 data below.

Totals may vary from the summation due to rounding.

  2017 2018 2019 2020
Total Revenue ($ in billions) 14.48 14.91 15.46 15.22
Adjusted Income From Operations ($ in billions) 2.63 2.74 2.81 2.65
Adjusted Operating Margin 18.2% 18.4% 18.2% 17.4%
Adjusted Earnings Per Share (in $) 3.22 4.20 4.40 4.03
Free Cash Flow ($ in billions) 1.77 2.08 2.11 2.66
Adjusted Operating EBITDA ($ in billions) 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.32
Adjusted Operating EBITDA Margin 27.7% 28.3% 28.4% 28.4%
Cash Dividends ($ in millions) 750 802 876 927
Share Repurchases ($ in millions) 750 1,008 248 402
Returned to Shareholders ($ in billions) 1.5 1.8 1.1 1.3
Cash From Operations ($ in billions) 3.2 3.6 3.9 3.4
Capital Expenditures ($ in billions) 1.5 1.7 1.8 1.6
Taxes
Income Taxes Paid ($ in millions)
U.S. 524.3 307.5 251.2 399.3
Canada 38.1 41.3 41.0 22.6
Real Estate Taxes Paid ($ in millions)
U.S. 58.0 63.7 61.3 62.2
Canada 5.6 5.8 5.8 5.7
Personal Property Taxes Paid ($ in millions)
U.S. Only 22.1 23.3 25.2 27.7
  2017 2018 2019 2020
Customer Service & Satisfaction
Enterprise Net Promoter Score 50.2
Overall Customer Satisfaction 54.9% 55.3% 58.7% 68.3%
Post-Contact Survey Customer Satisfaction 4.19% 4.25%
Fleet
Collection Vehicles 17,200 17,269 17,000 19,690
Alternative Energy Vehicles 6,536 7,944 8,924 10,388
Percentage of Alternative Energy Vehicles 38% 46% 50% 53%
Percentage of Alternative Energy Vehicles Using Renewable Natural Gas 30% 30% 40% 55%
Facilities
Renewable Energy—Landfill Gas Beneficial Use Projects
Landfill Gas-to-Electricity Facilities 102 101 97 104
Landfill Gas-to-Natural Gas Facilities 13 15 15 16
Landfill Gas to Industrial Customers as a Direct Substitute for Fossil Fuels 18 14 12 26
Natural Gas Fueling Stations 107 132 145 171
Landfills
Active Hazardous Waste Landfills 5 5 5 5
Active Solid Waste Landfills 244 247 244 263
Transfer Stations 305 314 302 348
Materials Recovery Facilities (MRFs) 85 88 103 103
Organics Facilities 4 4 44 42
Recycling
Materials Recycled (in tons)
Paper 9,025,439 8,635,161 8,079,346 7,744,197
Mixed Organics 3,376,683 3,591,346 3,577,122 3,358,832
Fly Ash 972,894 1,168,061 1,149,000 996,799
Glass 771,043 720,594 666,838 615,853
Metal 487,770 475,278 476,645 384,404
Plastic 433,040 349,499 403,484 502,459
C&D/Wood 115,036 202,329 1,120,832 1,381,865
E-waste/Lamps 31,295 19,404 9,110 32,122
Other1 121,608 0 0 14,123
Total Recyclables Managed 15,334,808 15,161,672 15,510,697 15,030,654
1 The “Other” material in 2017 is recycled concrete and other inert aggregate material and in 2020 was used oil.
Inbound Recycling Contamination
Total Inbound Recycling Contamination 15% 18% 17% 16%
Supply Chain
Diverse Supplier Spend ($ in millions) 191.0 234.2 264.1 244.2
Sustainable Supplier Spend ($ in millions) 263 253
Energy Intensity
MWh/Tons Waste 0.074335971 0.069711956 0.070207754 0.073994314
MWh/$ Net Operating 0.0005791 0.0005421 0.0005477 0.0005481
MWh/Employee 198.32 185.00 188.51 172.88
Fleet MWh/Tons Waste 0.051743932 0.051556652 0.051704055 0.05942588
Other Energy MWh/Employee 60.27 48.18 49.68 47.31
  2017 2018 2019 2020
Greenhouse Gas Emissions (MMT CO2e)
Scope 1—Direct Emissions
Landfill 13,633,140 14,536,271 13,965,549 14,602,131
Collection Fleet 1,345,898 1,321,914 1,209,237 1,019,617
Other Energy Use 710,955 413,959 449,846 461,473
Total Scope 1 15,689,993 16,272,144 15,624,632 16,083,220
Scope 2—Purchased Electricity 244,828 246,091 238,341 236,151
Total Scope 1 + Scope 2 15,934,821 16,518,235 15,862,973 16,319,371
The methodology used to calculate landfill emissions relies on multiple variables to estimate annual emissions, such as the amount of methane collected, and the tons and categories of waste received.The methodology relies on tons of waste that is in place as of January 1st of each year to estimate emissions for the rest of the reporting year, and therefore is not synchronized with other operational information or data in the reporting year. For example, in the reporting year January 1, 2020–December 31, 2020 the impact of COVID-19 resulted in fewer customer tons received compared to previous years, as well as a different mix of types of tons received. However, because landfill emissions calculation methodology relies on waste in place on January 1, 2020, the 2020 estimated emissions do not reflect the actual tons received throughout the reporting year.
Scope 3—Supply Chain Emissions 2,343,764 2,158,203 3,211,665 3,502,996
Between 2018 and 2019 we reevaluated our approach to Scope 3 accounting to improve accuracy which caused significant shifts in several categories, including elimination of some due to accounting roll up. We continue to improve our Scope 3 accounting and transparency year-over-year by working closely with the Supply Chain team and our suppliers.
Purchased Good & Services 470,255 428,823 1,610,356 1,515,191
Capital Goods 7,962,954 8,348,931 1,338,238 1,372,479
Fuel & Energy-Related Activities 423,504
Business Travel 20,545 19,693 20,672 9,037
Employee Commuting 208,391 215,288 221,200 177,563
Upstream Leased Assets 285 2,813
Downstream Leased Assets 1,934 2,409 1,716 1,250
Investments 30,228 19,198 1,157
Upstream Transport 1,190 1,498
Downstream Transport 317 363
Total Scope 3 8,665,586 9,047,233 3,211,665 3,502,994
Biogenic Emissions
Metdodology for Scope 3 biogenic emissions updated in 2020, and 2019–2017 have been updated to align with changes in methodology.
Biogenic Scope 1 11,760,390 11,957,838 12,432,517 12,689,901
Biogenic Scope 3 2,964,528 3,024,651 2,944,529 2,797,824
Carbon Intensity
CO2/$ Net Revenue 0.001100091 0.001107566 0.001026397 0.001072373
CO2 per Tons of Waste Disposed (metric tons) 0.141 0.142 0.136 0.143
Emissions per 1,000 Miles Driven 2.87 2.74 2.40 2.02
Potential GHG Emissions Avoided (MMT CO2e)
Renewable Energy Generation 2.40 2.19 2.10 2.18
Material Reuse & Recycling 32.59 31.32 30.06 28.55
Carbon Permanently Sequestered 19.48 20.04 20.74 21.99
Total Emissions Avoided 54.47 53.55 52.90 52.72
Landfill Gas Collected (MMBTU)
Landfill Gas Flared 45% 48% 47% 49%
Landfill Gas Recovered 54% 52% 53% 51%
Landfill Gas Beneficial Use Projects—Energy Generation
Landfill Gas-to-Electricity (MW) 410 416 402 380
Landfill Gas-to-Fuel (MW) 25 29 33 51
Total MW 443 444 435 431
Total Landfill Gas Collected (MMBTU) 56,960,000 58,630,000 58,060,000 56,130,000
Indirect CO2e Offset (tons/year) 2,400,000 2,190,000 2,100,000 2,180,000
Energy Consumption (MWh)
Non-Renewable Fuels 6,852,233 7,033,506 6,651,407 6,348,664
Non-Renewable Electricity 530,903 583,680 602,321 639,516
Total Non-Renewable Energy 7,383,136 7,617,185 7,253,728 6,988,180
Renewable Fuels 283,136 467,328 1,208,877 1,992,642
Renewable Electricity 0 122 1,362 958
Total Renewable Energy 283,136 467,449 1,210,238 1,993,600
Total Fuels 7,135,369 7,500,833 7,860,284 8,341,305
Total Electricity 530,903 583,802 603,682 640,474
Total Energy 7,666,272 8,084,635 8,463,966 8,981,779
Percent Renewable Energy 3.69% 5.78% 14.30% 22.20%
Percent Renewable Electricity 0.23% 0.15%
Non-Compliance Associated With Environmental Impacts
Number of Violations 1 7 1 7
Significant Spills 4 6 4 4
TRI Chemical Containment at Hazardous Waste Facilities
TRI data is reported a year behind.
RCRA Subtitle C 30,177,412 255,687 30,885,281 25,209,739
Underground Injection 10,134,130 76,596 7,940,553 6,466,667
Transfer Off-Site to Treatment/Containment 183,050 194,160 64,585 193,810
Waste Generated
Total Waste Generated (metric tons) 3,964 4,032 4,138 3,588
Total Waste Recycled (metric tons) 1,075 1,068 1,099 904
Percentage Recycled 27% 26% 27% 25%
Total Waste Landfilled (metric tons) 2,889 2,964 3,039 2,684
Percentage Landfilled 73% 74% 73% 75%
Total Waste Incinerated (metric tons) 0 0 0 0
Percentage Incinerated 0 0 0 0
Total Waste Per Employee (pounds) 210 209 208 192
Water Consumption (million cubic meters)
Total Municipal Water Supplies (or from other water utilities) 2.3 2.9 3.5 2.8
Fresh Surface Water (lakes, rives, etc.) 0 0 0 0
Fresh Ground Water 0.08 0.06 0.07 0.06
Water Returned to the Source of Extraction at Similar or Higher Quality as Raw Water Extracted 1.9 2.5 3.0 2.3
Total Net Fresh Water Consumption 0.52 0.54 0.58 0.54
  2017 2018 2019 2020
Employees
Total Employees 42,300 43,700 44,900 48,250
Employees by Region
U.S. 39,753 41,153 41,961 45,200
Canada 2,057 2,057 2,199 2,155
India 490 490 740 895
Employees by Payment Type
Hourly 81 81 80
Salaried 19 19 20
Employee Turnover
Voluntary Employee Turnover Rate 15.1 15.0 15.2 12.4
Employee Turnover Rate 22.2 22.0 21.0 16.6
Diversity
Ethnic Diversity and Female Representation categories below are designated by the Department of Labor and data are reported to the Equal Employment Opportunity department. Our 2020 Sustainability Report disclosed data for U.S. employees only. These tables have been updated to reflect company-wide data for all employees.
By Age
<30 Years Old 13% 11%
30–50 Years Old 51% 49%
>50 Years 36% 40%
Senior Leadership Team
Percentage Ethnic Minority 22% 22%
Percentage Women 33% 33%
Company Officials and Managers
Percentage Ethnic Minority 22% 22%
Percentage Women 20% 21%
Total Workforce
Percentage Ethnic Minority 45% 44%
Percentage Women 18% 18%
Percentage Women in All Management Positions 20% 21%
Percentage Women in Top Management Positions 20% 24%
Percentage Women in Junior Management Positions 20% 21%
Percentage Women in Management Positions in Revenue-Generating Functions 47%
Ratio of Basic Salary and Remuneration of Women to Men 1 1
Ethnic Diversity
Executive 13% 11% 12% 11%
Managers 20% 20% 21% 21%
Professionals 22% 21% 21% 19%
Operatives & Craft Workers 44% 45% 46% 46%
All Workforce 40% 41% 42% 41%
Female Representation
Executive 20% 21% 20% 19%
Managers 19% 19% 20% 21%
Professionals 39% 39% 39% 38%
Operatives & Craft Workers 2% 2% 3% 3%
All Workforce 17% 18% 18% 18%
Self-Identified as Disabled 20%
Veteran Status 6%
Share as Percentage of Total Workforce
Asian 1.6%
Black or African American 19.2%
Hispanic 22.2%
White 54.9%
Indigenous or Native 1.0%
Employee chose not to report 1.2%
Share in All Management Positions, as Percentage of Total Management Workforce
Asian 1.9%
Black or African American 7.8%
Hispanic 11.9%
White 77.3%
Indigenous or Native 0.4%
Employee chose not to report 0.8%
Safety
Days Away/Restricted or Transfer (DART)—Employees 2.7 2.9 2.2 2.3
Days Away/Restricted or Transfer (DART)—Contractors and Contingent Labor 0.13 0.15 0.11 0.11
Vehicle Accident Recordable Rate (VARR) 19,376 19,729 19,371 22,059
Hourly Accident Recordable Rate (HARR) 9,090 10,776 11,684 12,272
Total Recordable Injury Rate (incidents per 100 full-time employees per year) 2.8 2.9 2.8 2.8
Hires
Total number of new employee hires 9,250 10,616 11,645 8,369
Percentage of open positions filled by internal candidates (internal hires) 33 16 9 29
EEO-1 Data, 2019
Training
Average Hours of Training Per Employee 30 30
Average Spend Per Full-Time Employee (using blended learning techniques) (in $) 600 600
Average Spend per New Hire Drivers and Fleet Technicians (in $) 5,000 During 2020, all 2 week training was cancelled due to COVID‑19
Total Annual Training Hours Among Full-Time Employees 492,770 332,578
New and Current Employees Trained on Code of Conduct 100% 100%
Code of Conduct Training 100% 100%
Employees Offered Training 100% 100%
Operational Divisions Receiving Annual Training 100% 100%
Environmental Professionals Receiving Annual Safety Training 100% 100%
Drivers Receiving Annual Safety Training 100% 100%
Employees Trained Annually 37,342 46,000

Average hours of training per employee includes training completions tracked in Waste Management’s Talent Central System and an estimate of blended learning techniques (e.g., daily training huddles, weekly safety training, monthly observations and post-training reinforcement methods such as videos and practice sessions) that occur in the field.

Total annual training hours among full-time employees includes learning and development team salaries/contract labor, development costs, learning management system, travel, external products and services, materials.

Code of Conduct training includes trainers’ salaries, facilities, trucks and equipment, materials, travel/lodging/meals.

Employees trained annually includes training completions tracked in WM’s Talent Central System and an estimate of blended learning techniques (e.g., daily training huddles, weekly safety training, monthly observations and post-training reinforcement methods such as videos and practice sessions) that occur in the field.

  2017 2018 2019 2020
Community Vitality
Charitable Donations ($ in millions) 17.2 13.0 14.8 14.2
In-Kind Services ($ in millions) 1.9 1.9 1.6 1.2
Total Charitable Contributions Cash and In-Kind Donations ($ in millions) 17.2 14.9 16.4 15.4
Community Events Hosted and/or Participated In by WM >4,000 3,496 860
Environmental Conservation
Wildlife Habitat Council Certified Programs 90 83 79 75
Gold- and Silver-Certified Programs 38 32
Acres Actively Managed for Wildlife Preservation 20,000 19,823 17,917 14,709
Pollinator Gardens and Wildflower Meadows Projects 38 63 63 63
Habitat, Species and Education Certified Projects 'On-the-Ground' 255 217 190
Environmental Education
Participants in WM supported/hosted education events and programs number is significantly lower in 2020 due to constraints related to the pandemic.
Participants in WM Supported/Hosted Education Events and Programs 300,000 393,000 57,565
Hours Volunteered by Employees on Conservation Education 2,600 3,600
  2017 2018 2019 2020
Board Diversity
Percentage Ethnic Minority 20% 20% 33% 22%
Percentage Women 20% 20% 22% 33%
Annual Total Monetary Contributions to and Spending for Political Campaigns, Political Organizations, Lobbyists or Lobbying Organizations, Trade Associations and Other Tax-Exempt Groups
Lobbying, Interest Representation or Similar $ 411,000 $ 264,344 $ 250,000 $ 260,000
Local, Regional or National Political Campaigns/Organizations /Candidates $ 400,724 $ 572,558 $ 392,814 $ 210,350
Trade Associations or Tax-Exempt Groups (e.g., think tanks) $ 686,345 $ 550,241 $ 989,392 $ 860,605
Other (e.g., spending related to ballot measures or referendums) $ 18,500 $ 18,500 $ 18,500 $ 10,500
Total Contributions and Other Spending $ 1,516,569 $ 1,405,643 $ 1,650,706 $ 1,341,455
Contributions to or Expenditures to Trade Associations to Influence Political Campaigns or Public Policy and Legislation
Name of Organization Type of Organization Description Total Spend in FY 2020
National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) Trade association WM partners with NAM to address key issues facing the waste and recycling industries, including trade barriers to recycling, renewable electricity and fuel policies, Congressional engagement on sustainability matters and environmental justice. $ 26,220
Environmental Technology Council (ETC) Trade association WM partners with ETC to address specific issues facing our hazardous business units, including advocacy and agency outreach on improvements to the tracking of hazardous waste shipments, destruction and disposal of materials containing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, and the long-term storage and management of elemental mercury. $ 9,899
National Waste & Recycling Association (NWRA) Trade association WM partners with NWRA to address a wide range of federal and state issues, including tax reform, incentives to increase domestic recycling infrastructure, environmental policies impacting landfill and recycling operations, extended producer liability, international recycling standards, vehicle safety and employee health issues, infrastructure permitting, safety, the impacts of tariffs on recycling markets, recycling infrastructure legislation, the emerging contaminant PFAS (commonly found in discarded household products) and other workforce development issues. $ 41,897
The Coalition for Renewable Natural Gas   WM advocates EPA’s Renewable Fuel Standard Program as well as federal and state incentives to produce and use renewable transportation fuel and renewable electricity. $ 10,075
American Biogas Council   WM advocates before Congress and federal agencies for policy and regulations that encourage development of landfill gas to energy and fuels projects and anaerobic digesters. $ 9,425
Institute for Scrap Recycling Industries     $ 6,158
Amounts are based on the information provided by the association or organization. WM PAC contributions are excluded and can be found in our publicly available disclosure Participation in the Political Process.
Issue or Topic Corporate Position Description of Position / Engagement Total Spend in FY 2020
Renewable energy: WM has invested in infrastructure to collect landfill gas for a variety of applications to create renewable energy. First, WM has installed 124 landfill gas-to-energy facilities where we use the processed methane to generate electricity that is sold to utilities. EPA endorses landfill gas as a renewable energy resource, putting it in the same category as wind, solar and geothermal resources. Second, WM has installed four facilities that generate renewable natural gas (RNG) from landfill gas. RNG, which is recognized as a renewable fuel by EPA, is used as transportation fuel in over 45% of our natural gas trucks. Third, WM collects, processes and cleans landfill gas to natural gas quality for delivery of the RNG to transmission pipelines to be used in the normal applications for natural gas. In each of these renewable energy applications, WM has reduced its reliance on fossil fuels. Support WM supports federal and state energy policies that facilitate the widespread development and use of renewable energy sources, including electricity and transportation fuel derived from landfill gas. With a third of our trucks running on RNG produced from landfill biogas, federal and state policies play an important role in our efforts to make significant investments to reduce GHG emissions associated with fossil fuel consumption. Waste Management thus supports policies—including the Federal Renewable Fuel Standard, the California Low Carbon Fuel Standard, the Oregon Clean Fuels Program and state renewable portfolio standards—that encourage production of electricity and fuel from renewable sources such as municipal solid waste and provide attractive and stable returns to generators of renewable electricity and producers of RNG. $ 23,770.70
Recycling: Governments continue to seek ways to divert waste from landfills, while product manufacturers have established lofty recycling goals in order to find circular solutions for their packaging through increased recycling and recovery. Increased pressure by producers has led to efforts along the supply chain to recycle a broad range of materials. WM supports such programs when they make economic sense and strongly supports the development of education programs and market development to increase demand for recycling. Support WM has taken a national leadership role in support of policies to improve recycling education to ensure that a clean feedstock is delivered to our materials recovery facilities (MRFs), and to support the development of domestic markets for recyclables. Materials processed through our MRFs are only recycled after they have been manufactured into new product, reducing the use of virgin materials. In 2019, WM made a commitment to purchase curbside carts with 10% post-consumer curbside plastic. We also continue to support education efforts through our Recycle Right program. WM advocates for support of the focus on both education and market development for post-consumer content legislation. $ 84,235.95
  2019 2020
Reports of Potential Misconduct
Discipline for substantiated allegations included: counseling, warnings, suspensions and terminations.
Number of Reports of Potential Misconduct 2,558 2,938
Percent of Reports Made Through Confidential Integrity Helpline N/A 62%
Percent of Reports Through Other Avenues, Including People Organization (which includes independent investigation team), Corporate Security, Internal Audit, Senior Leadership, and Compliance and Ethics) N/A 38%
Percent of Total Reports Made Anonymously N/A 39%
Percent Employment Practices Matters (harassment, discrimination, unprofessional behavior, employee relations, etc.) 75% 76%
Percent Fraud-Related Matters (bribery, business practices, fraud, payroll fraud, etc.) 9% 8%
Percent Security-Related Matters (burglary, identity theft, privacy concerns, property damage, workplace violence, etc.) 9% 6%
Percent Other Code of Conduct Matters (conflicts of interest, gifts and entertainment, etc.) 7% 10%